Carbon dating and turin

Very old bogs often contain miniscule roots from newer plants that grew in the peat.

The roots of these plants, sometimes having decomposed, are nearly indistinguishable from the older peat.

For all who use carbon 14 dating to study all manner of ancient objects, a period of careful reassessment is just beginning.

There are, in understanding what went wrong, important lessons that will ripple through archeology, anthropology, forensics and science lecture halls whenever and wherever carbon 14 dating is discussed.

It should not be ignored when journalists and authors write about carbon 14 dating.

There are textbooks, encyclopedias and many websites to be updated. It is an extraordinary technology that with uncanny precision can count the approximately one in a trillion carbon 14 isotopes that exist compared to the more common carbon 12 and carbon 13 isotopes; isotopes that exist in all living material and material that once was living.

A January 20, 2005 article in the scholarly, peer-reviewed scientific journal Thermochimica Acta (Volume 425, pages 189-194, by Raymond N.

The Shroud of Turin is traditionally held to be the burial cloth of Jesus.Chemical tests show that dye is yellow alizarin from madder root complexed with alum, a common mordant. Cotton, alizarin and gum are only found in the C14 sample area of the shroud.The 1988 carbon 14 dating failure will not be ignored; for how does one ignore such a famous example.(Via BBC)The researchers say they believe they've discovered a way the shroud could be authentic but still date to medieval times: a magnitude-8.2 earthquake in ancient Jerusalem. The Telegraph quotes one of the researchers, saying, "We believe it is possible that neutron emissions by earthquakes could have induced the image formation on the Shroud's linen fibres ...and could also have caused a wrong radiocarbon dating."Of course, this is just one possible explanation for the shroud's origins.

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